Our fun arab world

I have been following the reactions of the arab population in regards to Saddam's death and those items sprang out to me as share-worthy:

Libya has declared 3 days of mourning over the death of Saddam and Qhaddafi is planning to build a statue of him in the capital.

Saddam's lawyer declared that in the final houres with Saddam, Saddam asked him about the Editors in Chief who were on his payroll. The Lawyer responded that all of them have falterd on his support, except for Mostafa Bakry, the editor of el Osboa, and the editor of Al Quds newspaper. Saddam replied: "well as long as those 2 are still standing their ground, then I have no fear for the future of the arab nations".

The Egyptian Journalists syndicate did a commoneration for Saddam yesterday, where he was decalred "in rank with the greatest leaders and the
national symbols of the Arab nation; those who live eternally in the
minds and hearts of the Arab people like Saladdin, Omar Al-Mukhtar and Saad Zaghloul. He is one of those who sacrificed for the good of the nation and it's liberty." Yes, cause when I think Saddam, I think Saladdin and Saad Zaghloul. Are those people high?

And finally, last but not least, Shaabola , at the meeting of national forces that oppose Saddam's execution, has declared that he believes that the US and Zionist entity will try to assassinate him for his fiery position against them. He then asked everyone there to take care of his children if that ever happened. Cause, you know how dangerous Shaabola is to the jewish zionist conpiracy!

Have a nice day!

0 comment on Our fun arab world

  1. Craig
    January 7, 2007 at 9:29 am

    Are we to assume that Saladin may not have been the great man we have been told he was, then?

    I don’t understand why Arabs would be so willing to discredit one of their few great heroes of the past by comparing him to a murdering thug like Saddam. Every time from now on when I hear an Arab or a Muslim telling me how great Saladin was, I’m going to think “Well, maybe not… Arabs think Saddam was just as good.”

    Reply
  2. Craig
    January 7, 2007 at 9:31 am

    By the way, Saladin was a Kurd, was he not? Should we ask the Kurds whether they think Saddam should be compared to Saladin? Or is it none of their business?

    Reply
  3. Adam B.
    January 7, 2007 at 10:23 am

    I like the fact that, according to the article, Gaddafi would have preferred for Saddam to have been tried by the brits and americans rather than the Iraqi government… I can’t recall any other public arab figure calling for this scenario – funny how there seems to be a different opinion for each arab leader even though they constantly claim total pan-arabic unity!!! :)

    Reply
  4. Rave
    January 7, 2007 at 11:28 am

    Its was so damn stupid to execute him on the first day of “Al-Adha” (muslims’ holiday) , honestly! If they did it any other day and without all these cameras, his death would’ve been alot less dramatic.
    Mubarak was right when he said Saddam is now viewed as a martyr.

    Reply
  5. Richard B.
    January 7, 2007 at 12:39 pm

    “I don’t understand why Arabs would be so willing to discredit one of their few great heroes of the past by comparing him to a murdering thug like Saddam.”

    It goes far beyond discrediting Saladin. It discredits Arabs as well for some to honor something like Saddam.

    Reply
  6. Jimmy
    January 7, 2007 at 1:43 pm

    Craig, the point is there is a an Arabic proverb that says “kolo ‘and el Arab saboon” which means “All is soap for an Arab”. Now those who compare Saladdin to Saddam are ignorat hypocrite Arabs, which makes doubles the misery.

    Reply
  7. Valerie
    January 7, 2007 at 2:39 pm

    And some people claim that the United States humiliates Muslims and Arabs — what could be more humiliating than to have your own government representatives celebrate a mass murderer and torturer?

    Yick!

    Reply
  8. Puniqe
    January 7, 2007 at 7:04 pm

    “national symbols of the Arab nation; those who live eternally in the
    minds and hearts of the Arab people like Saladdin”

    Can someone explain to me what Salah-el-Deen (a kurd who led armies of Turks and other non-arabs) has to do with “the Arab Nation”????

    Reply
  9. Puniqe
    January 7, 2007 at 7:11 pm

    “I don’t understand why Arabs would be so willing to discredit one of their few great heroes of the past by comparing him to a murdering thug like Saddam.”

    He’s not an Arab hero. Calling Salah-el-Deen an Arab is like calling Richard Lionheart an Italian king. It’s absurd, and makes no sense. The absolute one and only connection between Salah-el-Deen and Arabs (at all) is that Salah-el-Deen was a muslim and an Arab created the Islamic religion.

    Reply
  10. Adam B.
    January 7, 2007 at 9:43 pm

    Heh, he may not have been an arab hero, but the arabs (in general) certainly seem to see him as such – at least, they bring him out of the closet everytime they need some past hero to lean on…

    Reply
  11. RW
    January 7, 2007 at 10:04 pm

    Anyone who thinks the depraved people who are crying over Saddam’s less than church like quiet of a departure are kidding themselves.

    The complainers would have just taken up the rush to judgement and insulting timing on onset of the religious holiday as their mantra.

    And the media here in the US would be the echo chamber.

    Reply
  12. Max
    January 8, 2007 at 12:11 am

    “The Egyptian Journalists syndicate did a commoneration for Saddam yesterday,”
    In association with Osboa newspaper.
    “Saddam asked him about the Editors in Chief who were on his payroll. The Lawyer responded that all of them have falterd on his support, except for Mostafa Bakry, the editor of el Osboa”

    Reply

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