Palestinians arrested for plotting attacks in Sinai

Over 23 arrested. Egyptians and Palestinians. Amongst which a palestinian who got arrested wearing an explosive belt. The idea seems to be attacking israeli tourists in Egypt, possibly killing egyptians in the process. Doesn't matter, right? All in the name of the cause, right? What's a little terrorism between brother countries, right?

I hate this region! 

63 Comments on Palestinians arrested for plotting attacks in Sinai

  1. D.B Shobrawy
    February 22, 2007 at 12:44 am

    Simple solution- Restrict Palestinians from entering Sinai or Egypt for that matter. Problem solved!

    Reply
  2. d00d
    February 22, 2007 at 12:49 am

    I’m shocked! Shocked to find some Palestineans engaged in attempted acts terrorism!
    Of course, this story can’t be true & the guys who got arrested are Zionist hands, part of the usual Zionist plot to be all Ziony & stuff.

    Reply
  3. tedders
    February 22, 2007 at 1:25 am

    Do you think if the Pals were to be accepted in Egypt, Jordan, UAE, Lebennon, Syria(well maybe not Syria) Saudi etc. as immigrants and integrated into their societies, it would help ease the situation and improve the suffering of the Pals?

    Reply
  4. Richard B.
    February 22, 2007 at 1:49 am

    “I hate this region!”

    What? Is there something in the water that makes some people fools? I doubt that the region is the problem but rather some of the people who live in the region.

    Reply
  5. the tapper
    February 22, 2007 at 2:35 am

    Thank God, they got them coming across. Think of the damage they could have done if they got through and worse who would be blamed for the destruction ? !

    Reply
  6. leo
    February 22, 2007 at 2:42 am

    Welcome to the holy land under the Israelis not to mention gay parades etc….

    Reply
  7. shlemazl
    February 22, 2007 at 3:04 am

    Perhaps they are just returning the favour. After all, didn’t Egypt send Arafat onto them?

    Reply
  8. lynne
    February 22, 2007 at 3:21 am

    Well, don’t hate the whole region, just the fanatics. I can only hope that the radical fanatics become more moderate. The radical path only leads to misery and heartache for all.

    Reply
  9. the tapper
    February 22, 2007 at 3:23 am

    i realize a lot of water has gone under the bridge since 1960-63, but I was in Beirut throughout that time and met many pals there. They had been removed from their homes forcefully, and were now living outside the outskirts of Beirut in carboard huts. Much has happened since that time but, the fact remains it happened. It seems they are not welcomed anywhere in the ME. Maybe, Im wrong, but….

    Reply
  10. Zvi
    February 22, 2007 at 3:27 am

    Let’s see.

    1. Abbas and Rice meet.

    2. At exactly the same time, Islamic Jihad tries to carry out a suicide bombing in Rishon Lezion. Fortunately, they fail.

    3. At the same time, a large gang of Palestinian terrorists has been trying to carry out a suicide bombing in Sinai. Fortunately, they fail too.

    I have noted that on many occasions, when peace talks between the Israelis and Palestinians appeared to be bearing fruit and things were calming down significantly, the Palestinian Islamic Jihad carrief out a suicide bombing that killed large numbers of Israelis, destroying the fragile accords. And when this happened, both the Israelis and the Palestinians obtained intelligence that the act of terrorism had been ordered from Damascus rather than from the territories themselves.

    Given this history, I find the timing of the latest attempted acts of terrorism to be a bit suspicious. Someone evidently thought that there was some chance of Olmert, Abbas and Rice striking some kind of deal that would calm tensions (though personally, I viewed this summit as a pure photo op and thought that it would amount to nothing). Someone who bankrolls Palestinian terrorists evidently wanted to make sure that nothing would come of the summit.

    Reply
  11. leo
    February 22, 2007 at 3:49 am

    Zvi @ 10

    “Someone who bankrolls Palestinian terrorists evidently wanted to make sure that nothing would come of the summit”

    In early 90s Israelis and Palestinians were able to hold numerous covert meetings mostly in Europe. May be this practice should be adapted again.

    Just a thought.

    Reply
  12. Howie
    February 22, 2007 at 4:42 am

    Tapper-

    Who would deny there is a problem? Who would deny that there was injustice? However…this is such an old arguement goes round and round which is…has their methodology for solving their problems been fruitful? The obvious answer is that it as been an abject failure…So what do they do? Continue more of the same that has not helped them…Has worked for 60+ years and it won’t work in the future. Blowing up a bunch of Israeli kids and some Egyptians would do what? Help them cathart their hurt feelings? Express their rage? What?

    Reply
  13. the tapper
    February 22, 2007 at 7:20 am

    howie:
    I do not know the answer. It is so complex. Education and re-education with emphasis on oneness. not seperateness. Hatred breeds hatred. To be taught from the time you are knee high to a grasshopper that the Jews are monkeys and pigs can do nothing but instill hatred. Someone has to make a stand and change things and it’ll only come by force probably, as it did in Turkey in the 1930s’ Attiturk turned a nation around and aat one time, he was looked upon as father of that nation. I haven’t been there for years but, I know he was.

    Reply
  14. Modern Pharaoh
    February 22, 2007 at 8:31 am

    There is no Answer to the Palestinian issue guys! The palis Deserve Part of their land back, and so does the Israeli who was born and raised in Israel now and knows it as his home!

    This problem could have been solved in the begining but now….its too late!

    And Sandmonkey, i’m not trying to be an ass, but if you hate this region so much howcome you stay there?

    ps: IN USA yesterday over 22 murders and 35 sexual assaults took place..so don’t think this is Heaven here either ;)

    Reply
  15. Zvi
    February 22, 2007 at 9:11 am

    @leo:

    But talk to whom? That is the question.

    Abbas: While I think that in his heart, Mr. Abbas *wants* to be a decent person, he is a very weak leader. He cannot compel obedience. He has very little charisma.

    If he signs a treaty, it will be Mr. Abbas’ treaty with Israel – not that of the Palestinian Authority or even of Fatah. So if Israel makes concessions in exchange for that signature, it has simply squandered them, leaving nothing to trade later to ensure that its really vital interests are preserved. Thus, concessions to Abbas could well POSTPONE a peace that might otherwise become possible later on.

    Then there’s HAMAS. Israel can’t talk to HAMAS. This is a recognition that HAMAS’s insistence on wiping out Israel’s Jews is not simply a political position: it is the central tenet of HAMAS’ ideology. For HAMAS leaders, abandoning their ideology equals abandoning principles altogether and becoming, by their warped standards, dishonest and corrupt.

    So to whom can Israel talk meaningfully?

    Reply
  16. Zvi
    February 22, 2007 at 9:22 am

    @MP:

    It won’t fly. There are too many people exiled from too many places. The Arab/Muslim world have never given Jews from the region their property back either.

    What can work, eventually, is
    * mutual compensation paid mostly in cash and investment rather than in land
    * 2 states side by side in peace, with all acts of terrorism treated as acts of terrorism
    * possibly some mutually agreed, voluntary land swapping
    * The holy places issue could be creatively resolved. The ruins of the Jewish temple are UNDER the Dome of the Rock, etc, not IN it. Israeli sovereignty could extend from a certain depth down, and Palestinian sovereignty could exist from a certain point up (vertical rather than horizontal border). Specific treaty provisions and enforcement would be required to prevent misbehavior – but that’s true of any sensitive point in any treaty.
    * If the trust relationship could be repaired, many things are possible. But the trust relationship can only be repaired when Palestinian leaders accept non-violence as the only viable way forward.

    Sadly while people continue to tell the Palestinian terror gangs to “hang in there, we believe in you”, that won’t happen.

    Reply
  17. egyptiankangaroo
    February 22, 2007 at 9:23 am

    Palestinians should not be allowed to enter Sinai. They keep on trying to take their war to Lebanon.Like they did in the 70′s and 80′s now that is not working, they are trying to take it to Sinai. They want to see Egypt fail in everyway. They have to be behind the Sinai bombings. Their powers have been crushed in the west bank and Gaza and they now understand that if they di attack Israelis in Israel the Israelis will bomb the living hell out of them or kill the leaders one by one, so what do they do they do hit and run attacks in Sinai. Doesn’t take a genuis to figure that one out. It is time the Egyptian Government took measures in not letting them in, Because every time a bomb goes off in Sinai it is the Egyptians that suffer! If they wanted peace they would have attended the Mena house talks !

    Reply
  18. Aardvark EF-111B
    February 22, 2007 at 10:54 am

    After long years of turning a blind eye to the smuggle of Cache, Arms, Ammo & TNT into Gazza [payment in drugs for the pleasure of Egyptian teens & youth] to support the Jihad against Jewish infidels, the resistance became terribly difficult for them in Gazza (thanks to IDF brutality) and now they are trying to hit softer targets in Sinai.

    Dear Palestinian Martyr Projects, I has been a pleasure dealing with you !!!!!

    Such a lovely neighborhood indeed !!!!!

    And a salute for Egyptian Border security who decided at last to stop corruption and do their job !!!!! (ha ha ha — da da da I do love you, you do love me…) Christina Augillera

    Reply
  19. loves2spooj
    February 22, 2007 at 12:53 pm

    Having problems with Palestinian death-bots? Then look no further than our patented Zionist Jew Wall*! Simply install the wall near any area currently infested with Palestinian kill-bots and watch as suicide bombings, kidnappings and sniper attacks magically cease! But dont believe us, just listen to our happy customers

    - I installed the Zionist Jew Wall two weeks ago and I noticed a decrease in being killed by Jihadi head hackers almost immediately. Its worth its weight in stolen organs of Palestinian children, and more! – Rabbi Shekel Mashlekelom

    - I’ve was being blown up by fanatical murder crazed Palestinians almost every week untill I installed Zionist Jew Wall – and the kids loved the free poison balloons that the friendly salesperson gave us. We had such fun releasing them over Lebanon! – Fran Drescher

    * Zionist Jew Wall may cause unrelated outbreak of terror supporting bleeding heart protests, use is at your own risk and Jew-Co and its subsiduary Magic Death Balloons incorporated take no responsibility for damage caused by conspiracy theorists, Jimmy Carter or radical socialist activists.

    Reply
  20. Jordan
    February 22, 2007 at 1:49 pm

    loves2spooj, that is messed up! Not to mention the funniest thing I have ever heard… tell me you didn’t just make that up.

    Reply
  21. leo
    February 22, 2007 at 2:16 pm

    Zvi @ 16

    I hear you and agree by most part but there are some types of agreements, which cannot be undone.

    I do not know if Barrack’s offer was good or bad and if it is still on the table or not but
    if Israelis and Palestinians will finally be able to disengage and second state will be formed
    it will become impossible to undo it no matter what HAMAS’s views are.
    Any attack by terrorists will be interpreted as act of aggression and dealt with accordingly.
    Just imagine if Palestine were state today and those terrorists were caught, do you think Egypt would be sitting on its butt doing nothing about it?
    At very least Egyptians would’ve forced Palestinian authorities to deal with it in harshest way possible.

    egyptiankangaroo @ 18

    Something does not add up here.

    If Palestinians “… They [Pals] want to see Egypt fail in everyway. They have to be behind the Sinai bombings …”, where do they get their weapons from? Who is helping them? Israelis? Didn’t I just create another conspiracy theory?

    Reply
  22. Fabian from Israel
    February 22, 2007 at 2:30 pm

    I live in Rishon LeTzion (where the bombing was probably due to take place) and it was very tense for me, waiting for my wife to come back home, while she was telling me that she was in a bus and the roads were all closed and there was police everywhere.

    Reply
  23. BISA
    February 22, 2007 at 3:01 pm

    I’m sorry for you Fabian. I grew up in Saudi Arabia but we had to leave because terrorists started targeting foreigners. There was once 10k from my house in this compound I used to go to all the time. Really violent as well, not just a bomb, instead the terrorists went door to door questioning people “Are you Muslim? Are you Christian?” You can guess what they did to the ones who answered wrong. They even beheaded the Swedish cook at one of my favorite restaurants.

    Reply
  24. BISA
    February 22, 2007 at 3:03 pm

    Just because he was European.

    Reply
  25. SoCalJustice
    February 22, 2007 at 3:08 pm

    SM:

    “It’s a dangerous precedent because it will impact the only free space available now, which is the Internet. The charges were undefined and vague,” said a fellow blogger who attended the trial and runs the “Rantings of a Sandmonkey” blog (http://sandmonkey.org/).

    It’s a much, much worse precedent than that, SM. And the “charges” were ridiculous and unbefitting humanity and modernity. The Egyptian government should face consequences for convening this kangaroo court over such a matter.

    On a separate note, I guess the “servers were offshore” argument didn’t fly. As if that was the issue anyway.

    I hope the FREE ABEDL KARIM movement ramps up.

    Reply
  26. leo
    February 22, 2007 at 3:16 pm

    yochanan @ 24

    This link. It reminded me of old Cold War era joke and it goes like this.

    American and Russian meet and eventually get in to argument which is better US or SU and who has more freedom.

    After arguing for a while finally American goes: I can stand in front of the White House and curse my President in anyway I like. What about you?
    Russian goes: Big deal. I too can stand in the middle of Red Square and curse your President in anyway I like.

    I cannot find USSR on the map anymore.

    Reply
  27. yochanan
    February 22, 2007 at 3:30 pm

    Putin is trying for it rebirth a bit smaller and weaker but ….

    Reply
  28. Iraqi American
    February 22, 2007 at 4:06 pm

    ‘What? Is there something in the water that makes some people fools? I doubt that the region is the problem but rather some of the people who live in the region.’

    I agree.

    Reply
  29. HeiGou
    February 22, 2007 at 4:12 pm

    leo Says:”I hear you and agree by most part but there are some types of agreements, which cannot be undone. I do not know if Barrack’s offer was good or bad and if it is still on the table or not but if Israelis and Palestinians will finally be able to disengage and second state will be formed it will become impossible to undo it no matter what HAMAS’s views are. Any attack by terrorists will be interpreted as act of aggression and dealt with accordingly.”

    You mean like ….. Lebanon? Israel withdrew. Lebanon agreed to police its border. Rockets have been flying over ever since. Terrorism cannot be dealt with by military means. Or at least not well. You need the police to stand over them and hunt them down and their trainers and handlers. The police need some sort of civil administration. I agree the second state will be impossible to undo – no one will allow Israel to destroy it now. But that does not mean that terrorism won’t undo the first state in the end.

    leo Says:”Just imagine if Palestine were state today and those terrorists were caught, do you think Egypt would be sitting on its butt doing nothing about it?”

    No, I think they would be hushing it all up.

    leo Says:”At very least Egyptians would’ve forced Palestinian authorities to deal with it in harshest way possible.”

    How? Israel can’t.

    Reply
  30. Jim
    February 22, 2007 at 4:14 pm

    I’m sorry to hear of your legal problems arising from you blog postings,-but not surprised. As long as Egypt (and anyone else) follows the teachings of the maniac, Muhammad and Islam, you’ll have this problem; the problem of being a slave to Allah. I read and enjoy your postings and hope you will see what a farce Islam is before you are made to spend the rest of your life in prison for stating your opinion. I hope this doesn’t offend you. Islam offends all.

    Reply
  31. Howie
    February 22, 2007 at 4:35 pm

    Tapper and Moderan Pharoah…

    It is because of responses like your’s and people like you…that has me addicted to these blogs. There will always be the screamers and the extremists from both sides…and then I hear these voices of reason and it gives me hope that I had pretty much lost.

    The Arabs have their perspective of the problem…and we have ours…For myself…I never deny that the Palestinians have valid points and valid claims. But like MP said…this could have been settled long long ago and there would be many a person now living and or not disabled or in permante grief if it would have been settled.

    From my part…I blame Arab rejectionists much more than I do Israel…though Israel is not without blame. I also strongly believe that the Arabs have taken the exact measures that defeat their cause…war and terror which only hardens Israel’s stand and increases hatred, fear, distrust and a thirst for revenge.

    As a counselor type…I can’t help but look at it as a dysfunctional family relationship; “I have a problem with your behavior…so I do something (nag, criticize, yell, threaten, hit)…you react with even worse behavior. So I increase my nagging, threatening etc….You get worse….I increase.” Though I might feel justified in my reaction…it is only serving to make your behavior worse…but I am in the rut of doing what clearly is not working. Round and round we go.

    So it has gone on and on with no shortage of blame and accusations.

    Reply
  32. Crazy Prof
    February 22, 2007 at 4:44 pm

    Egypt blogger jailed for insulting Islam – Islam Can’t Allow Freedom Of Religion Or Freedom Of Press – Islam Can’t Allow Self Examination As Christianity Allows And Encourages In The West

    ALEXANDRIA, Egypt (Reuters) – An Alexandria court convicted an Egyptian blogger on Thursday for insulting both Islam and Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak and sentenced him to four years in jail over his writings on the Internet.

    Abdel Karim Suleiman, a 22-year-old former law student who has been in custody since November, was the first blogger to stand trial in Egypt for his Internet writings. He was convicted in connection with eight articles he wrote since 2004.

    Rights groups and opposition bloggers have watched Suleiman’s case closely, and said they feared a conviction could set a legal precedent limiting Internet freedom in Egypt, the Arab world’s most populous country.

    “It’s a dangerous precedent because it will impact the only free space available now, which is the Internet. The charges were undefined and vague,” said a fellow blogger who attended the trial and runs the “Rantings of a Sandmonkey” blog (http://sandmonkey.org/).

    “Tell me. What does insulting the president mean? What is the difference between criticizing religion and being in contempt of religion?” he added, asking to remain anonymous.

    The Internet has emerged as a major forum for critics of the Egyptian government to express their views in a country where the large daily newspapers and main television stations are state-run.

    While Suleiman was the first blogger to go on trial for the content of his writings, other opposition bloggers have been arrested periodically during street protests and then held for weeks or months before being released.

    22 February, 2007 11:40

    Reply
  33. Egypeter
    February 22, 2007 at 4:55 pm

    DEVESTATING news about porr Kareem Amer!!!

    I can’t believe it! My heart is broken for that young fellow who’s stuck going off to some dank diseased Egyptian prison! This was a huge test for Egypt regarding Freedom of Anything…and Egypt failed with a 0.0%!! What a disaster.

    Now what? Is blogging done with it? Are those MB blogs you mentioned earlier the only ones that will be tolerated? Who’s next?! Where is Egypt headed?

    And the MOST sickening part of it all is the rejoicing that is going around the country!! Ask yourself, and honestly, why didn’t more Egyptians stand up for Kareem? I’m afraid I know the answer.

    Let me leave you with this little nugget:

    “I was hoping that he would get a harsher sentence because he presented to the world a bad image of Egypt. There are things that one should not talk about, like religion and politics. He should have got a 10-year sentence,” said lawyer Nizar Habib, who attended the trial as a member of the public.”

    WTF?!?! And that comes from an EDUCATED attorney not some ‘fellah’…

    Reply
  34. Howie
    February 22, 2007 at 5:05 pm

    Egypter

    “why didn’t more Egyptians stand up for Kareem? I’m afraid I know the answer.”

    This is a hugely important question…Egypt is a huge, powerful and important country and, with all its oppression…has some elements of freedom that other countries in the area do not enjoy.

    If Egypt goes by way of MB or some other Talibanization…I think not only Egypt, but the world will become a darker place.

    Reply
  35. leo
    February 22, 2007 at 5:32 pm

    “You mean like .. Lebanon?”

    I do not know how it is going to come out but even ‘like Lebanon’ is better than current situation. And with all this Nasrallah’s victory bravado how many rockets did fly over to Israel since last August?

    “No, I think they would be hushing it all up.”

    Hardly. They might not want to make it a wide spread knowledge but I think they will quickly and quietly screw couple of balls off and everything will fall in to place.

    “How? Israel can’t.”

    No, Israel can’t but Egyptians can. Because it is going to not zionist monkey jooz oppressing and killing poor innocent defenseless Palestinians but rather Arabs killing Arabs and, as we can see from example of Iraq, this is something rest of the world (including ME countries) does not pay much attention to.

    Reply
  36. leo
    February 22, 2007 at 5:33 pm

    Sorry, forgot to mention, my last comment was response to HeiGou @ 32.

    Reply
  37. abuTrevor
    February 22, 2007 at 6:20 pm

    “I hate this region!”

    I hope you don’t end up on trial like Abdel Karim. I’ve been reading and enjoying your blog for some time and don’t want you to end up in prison.

    D.B Shobrawy said:
    “Simple solution- Restrict Palestinians from entering Sinai or Egypt for that matter. Problem solved!”

    That’s part of the problem: 1.4 million people are confined to the tiny area of the Gaza Strip. If the Arab nations accepted some of these as immigrants and re-settled them, a lot of the problems would disappears (sigh – I guess I’m an optimist).

    The incident BISA describes occured about 2km from where I’m sitting right now. My experience was similar to that described by Fabian except that my wife was at home waiting for me. Fortunately for me this was a one off; Fabian may no be so lucky.

    Reply
  38. Aliandra
    February 22, 2007 at 7:25 pm

    why didn’t more Egyptians stand up for Kareem? I’m afraid I know the answer.

    I think if there were 500 protestors standing outside that courtroom, it would make a good point. And if those 500 get carted off to jail, the next day there should be 1000 protestors, and so on …

    There comes a point where there isn’t room in prison for so many people and the government will get the point. Ghandhi did the peaceful protest idea quite effectively.

    Reply
  39. asiatown77
    February 22, 2007 at 7:51 pm

    Hi there:

    I am an oppressed Palestinian. Having grown up in a refugee camp, where my parents were born and where my grandparents moved sixtysome years ago, I see no options other than to stay here and mooch, while occassionally conning stupid young men and women into blowing themselves up by offering money to their loving parents. Sure I could have left this camp- after all, I have numerous relatives in Jordan, on the West Bank, and of course Michigan and South Florida, as well as a nifty trust fund run by some of these lads- but come on now– going to work every day, paying a mortgage, looking after the rugrats spawned by my four wives- what’s the fun in that?

    Wanna know my idea of fun? I like to con kids who think they have no future into killing people. You should see how proud their mom’s are! And after all, many have no future. Ever been to Jenin? Ever been to Tel Aviv? Now honestly, which one would you pick? Ha! So you see, I’m not doing anything they don’t want to do themselves. I’m just a helping spirit.

    Help me by misappropriating some U.N. funds and sending some weapons to me today!

    P.S.: And don’t talk to me about Gaza. Don’t talk to me about the university, the greenhouses, the whole suburban thing those Jew pigs left us. That’s totally gone now. I mean puh-leeze…schools, pavement and running water? Can you spell Zionist Imperialism? I can: N-i-h-i-l-i-s-m. So there. I’m totally smurt.

    Reply
  40. BISA
    February 22, 2007 at 8:34 pm

    @abuTrevor: so how are things in the kingdom these days? I have heard from people still living there that the tension has died down. Guess the boiling point is still in the future. :/
    Do you remember how much the government hid about the attack? So much went on that day.

    Reply
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    Today, finally, somebody is listening.

    Spirko feels that both sides must return to the Camp David Peace Talks and resume where they left off and “freeze in place” the already-agreed-upon negotiating points.

    “It’s like a marriage where both spouses storm away mad in an argument.
    They don’t divorce and then try to resume their relationship, they come back together, settle their differences, and resume their marriage. It must be the same for the Middle East Peace talks,” Spirko says.

    The story begins in Beirut, Lebanon, once a great financial capital of the Middle East, which lay in ruin, having been systematically blasted to rubble during 20 years of inexhaustible civil war and siege by Israel, the PLO, Hamas, Hezbollah and Lebanese factions. Soon, the quest for a Palestinian State would be framed by these events; namely, the invasion of Kuwait by a neighboring rogue state, Iraq, with Saddam Hussein’s goal of seeking nuclear parity with Israel.

    In Mr. Spirko’s story, Rick Waite, a forgotten UPI correspondent, and Adrienne Waters, a Pulitzer Prize journalist from the London Times, meet-up in Beirut with a PLO operative named Ahmed, who discovers a secret intelligence memo about a secret plan to destroy Israel.

    In the ensuing chase to find the answer to this secret communiqué and what it means, a deadly race against time begins as the unlikely trio tries to halt the launch of a secret weapon from a hidden PLO base camp in the Syrian Desert. U. S. and British intelligence operatives have their own agenda, and attempt to stop whatever is going on to save the entire region from a nuclear holocaust.

    Spirko weaves a tale of chilling duplicity and thrilling action, as the characters evade and devise a method to announce the discovery of nuclear-tipped ballistic missiles to the rest of the world – all while United Nations’ delegates bicker endlessly.

    An executive at BookMasters, Inc., says, “The book is absolutely stunning in the manner in which Mr. Spirko, tells his tale. He is truly a master as an analyst, and it’s totally unlike anything else we’ve ever read in a spy-thriller. It keeps you turning pages and won’t let you quit – until the very end. And, what an ending it is! If you crave twisting plots, thrilling spy-action and intriguing characters, then this is the book for you.”

    Spirko, whose own background includes a stint in the U. S. Air Force and has given his advice to the National Security Council in Washington, D. C., has a degree in journalism and knows first-hand about the newsroom and what it takes to be an intelligence field agent. His knowledge of the trade makes the story real, daunting, and strikingly similar to “The Year of Living Dangerously.”

    “THE PALESTINE CONSPIRACY drips with reality,” quips a book reviewer from Olive Grove Publishers. “If books were rated by Siskel & Roeper, it would be given a two-thumbs up.”

    Not since, Casablanca, do characters as earthy as Rick Waite, or as beautifully mysterious as London Times reporter, Adrienne Waters, or as desperate as PLO operative, Ahmed, bring fresh characters to a story that will be remembered by readers for a long time.

    The novel is a mass market paperback produced by Olive Grove Publishers, and can be purchased at area bookstores through Ingram Book Group, New Leaf Distribution, and Baker and Taylor, priced at $14.99, ISBN 0-9752508-0-9. THE PALESTINE CONSPIRACY can also be ordered on the web at http://www.atlasbooks.com, or email orders from: order@bookmasters.com, or from Barnes & Nobles, Border’s, Dalton’s, efollett.com & Follett bookstores at colleges and universities, WaldenBooks, Amazon.com, Walmart.com, Target.com and other popular retail bookstores. Or, readers and store managers can call 1-800-BOOKLOG, or 800-247-6553 direct, to order.

    For readers who want to know what was really going on in the Middle East prior to the Persian Gulf War, Sept. 11th, and Iraq War, THE PALESTINE CONSPIRACY, is a must read.

    WARREN, Ohio – When both sides walked away from the peace table at Camp David in 2000, Robert Spirko, author of THE PALESTINE CONSPIRACY warned negotiators Ehud Barak of Israel and Chairman Yasser Arafat that they would descend into the abyss of hell.

    “And, they did,” Spirko says, “and, so have we.” Spirko is a native of Warren and a former Tribune staff writer.

    That warning came after both sides had already agreed upon Jerusalem as the simultaneous capital of both Israel and Palestine, according to Spirko.

    “When both parties agreed on Jerusalem, an issue they both said they could never agree on, then left the peace table over reparations and the right of return, 8,000 lives were lost in the ensuing four years, including America’s 9/11 catastrophe,” Spirko reveals. “Chairman Arafat should have taken the deal. He had 90% of what he wanted. The Israelis offered to build upon that later if Arafat would stop the suicide bombers.
    Chairman Arafat would take the same deal today if it was offered, but it may be too late.”

    He explains, “The failed talks were a catastrophe for both the Middle East, and the United States, and the only way out is to resurrect the peace talks at Camp David, freeze the already agreed upon points, and resume where both parties left off.”

    Spirko has given his advice to the National Security Council in Washington, D. C. over the years, and is a 1965 graduate of the Kent State University School of Journalism. He studied for his MBA at Kent State University and currently analyzes geo-political trends as an investment advisor.

    He wrote the book as a spy-thriller detailing what and how the quest for a Palestinian State turned into an ongoing disaster predicting Iraq and Iran would seek to develop weapons of mass destruction. The yet-to-be-resolved “right of return” and reparations were ignored by both sides at the 2000 Camp David Peace Talks. Those issues could have been negotiated later. Ideas presented by Mr. Spirko at those peace talks included letting both sides have the right to name Jerusalem as each nation’s capital, an idea that the BBC in Great Britain termed as “brilliant.”.

    “The idea was to create simultaneous capitals for both countries-Palestine and Israel-with Jerusalem as the capital of each using congruous zones and a neutral governing district involving representatives from both sides with God as the central sovereign because they both believe in the same God, whether He is called Allah or Jehovah,” Spirko reiterates.

    “As we speak, Israel’s Ariel Sharon lies in a coma and Yasser Arafat is dead. Israel agreed to a withdrawal from Israeli settlements in Gaza, and a partial withdrawal in the West Bank. That could have been achieved six years ago at Camp David. Now, Hezbollah and Hamas have thrown a monkey-wrench into the scenario which could lead the United States and the world into World War III.”

    Spirko’s book takes place in Beirut, Lebanon. It details what he thought would occur in the Middle East before the actual events; namely, the Persian Gulf War, the Iraq War, the Intifada, and other events leading up to Sept. 11. His analysis, written as a novel in 1987 and copyrighted in the U.S. Library of Congress that year, warned that the Middle East was heading toward nuclear Armageddon if a rogue Arab state, Iraq or Iran, obtained nuclear weapons. For 17 years publishers refused to publish the book because they told Mr. Spirko that the events he described in his book “couldn’t possibly happen.”

    MEDINA, Ohio – “The Middle East is heading toward a new World War if Syria and Iran continue to aid and abet terrorism and try to develop nuclear weapons to threaten both Israel and the United States,” says Robert Spirko, author of THE PALESTINE CONSPIRACY, a book which predicted both wars in the region.

    He says both Iran and Syria are treading on dangerous ground in their quest to continue the war in Palestine and in attempting to enrich uranium for use in an atomic bomb.

    Spirko, a financial and geo-political analyst, turned his attention to the Middle East in 1987, after discovering several common elements related to the Middle East question. He wrote down his analysis, and when he was finished, he not only had a solution to the quagmire, he had a story to tell.

    THE PALESTINE CONSPIRACY predicted many of the events that occurred three years later, even the firing of missiles which hit Israel.

    “The United States, Great Britain, France, Russia, and China will never allow them to obtain enough nuclear technology to construct weapons of mass destruction,” says Spirko.

    Spirko, whose book foreshadowed the Persian Gulf War by three years, and the resultant Iraq War following the Sept. 11 attack, warned the consequences would be catastrophic for those Muslim nations who insist on continuing down that nuclear path.

    “The chief threat in the region I see right now is the threat to Saudi Arabia by Al Quaida. If Al Quaida were to overthrow the present royal family in Saudi Arabia, cutting off the oil supply to the western nations including Japan and China, it would bring down entire world economies.
    France and Germany would be begging us to go to war to retake those oil wells. It would be World War III,” he emphasizes.

    If such a scenario were to occur, France and the European economies could collapse in a matter of weeks.

    “And, it’s all related to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict which I said back in 1987 was the crux of my book. It always has been, and always will be until it’s settled. That linkage is exactly what Osama Bin Laden stated in a taped message aired the weekend before the election in November of 2004. Whether you believe him or not is beside the point. That’s what’s he told us, and we’d better take that into account.”

    “We are again on the threshold of peace in the Middle East. But, we’re also on the threshold of World War III. We better get it right this time, ” Spirko emphasizes.

    CLEVELAND, Ohio – THE PALESTINE CONSPIRACY, a genre spy-thriller by Robert Spirko, was fourth on the best-seller list at Atlasbooks, Inc., a national book distributor.

    Spirko, a financial and geo-political analyst who has given his advice to the National Security Council, turned his attention to the Middle East in 1987, after discovering several common elements related to the Middle East question. He wrote down his analysis, and when he was finished, he not only had a solution to the quagmire, he had a story to tell. THE PALESTINE CONSPIRACY foreshadowed the Persian Gulf War by three years, and the resultant Iraq War followed by the Sept. 11 attack.

    Spirko states, “The chief threat in the region I see right now is the threat to Saudi Arabia by Al Qaeda. If Al Qaeda were to overthrow the present royal family in Saudi Arabia, cutting off the oil supply to western nations including Japan and China, it would bring down entire world economies. France and Germany would be begging us to go to war to retake those oil wells. It would be World War III.”

    “If such a scenario were to occur,” he reiterates, “France and the European economies would collapse in a matter of weeks.”

    “Another looming concern is Iran which wants to develop nuclear weapons to couple with their Shahab 4, 5 & 6 missiles on the drawing boards which have a range to hit London, Israel, all of Europe, southern Russia and the United States. Also, the Iranian government has said it initially had 300 centrifuges to enrich uranium to weapons grade material. They have increased that to 3,000. They will soon increase that again to 10,000 centrifuges,” Spirko says. “They have the additional capacity to add another 20,000 centrifuges in mass production techniques that will enable them to produce at least seven nuclear bombs in about a year. Where did they get these centrifuges?”

    Spirko answers that question by stating an Arab proverb, “The enemy of my enemy is my friend.”

    “Simply put,” Spirko explains, “they probably got them from Saddam Hussein before the Iraq War started and were probably smuggled out of Iraq and into Iran just like he did his air force of 600 Soviet fighter planes. In other words, he gave them to his former enemy rather than let them be destroyed on the ground.”

    “Why would he have done any differently with the 30,000 centrifuges he supposedly had on a decentralized basis inside Iraq before the war?” Spirko asks. “Isn’t it strange that Iran could come up with a nuclear weapons program in about six months to a year when it took the United States six years under the Manhattan Project with 5,000 of the world’s most brilliant scientists like Robert Oppenheimer, Niels Bohr, Seaborg, Einstein, Fermi, and others working on it?”

    Another point Spirko makes on the Mideast is that, “It is time for the Israelis and Palestinians to return to the Camp David Peace Talks or some other place, resume where they left off and “freeze in place” the already-agreed-upon negotiating points,” Spirko says.

    “And, it’s all related to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict which I said back in 1987 was the crux of my book. It always has been, and always will be until it’s settled,” Spirko says. “That linkage is exactly what Osama Bin Laden stated in a taped message aired the weekend before the election in November of 2004. Whether you believe him or not is beside the point. That’s what’s he told us, and we’d better take that into account.”

    The novel is a mass market paperback produced by Olive Grove Publishers, and can be purchased at area bookstores through Ingram Book Group, New Leaf Distribution, and Baker and Taylor, priced at $14.99, ISBN 0-9752508-0-9. THE PALESTINE CONSPIRACY can also be ordered on the web at http://www.atlasbooks.com, or email orders from: order@bookmasters.com, or from Barnes & Nobles, Border’s, Dalton’s, efollett.com & Follett bookstores at colleges and universities, WaldenBooks, Amazon.com, Walmart.com, Target.com and other popular retail bookstores. Or, readers and store managers can call 1-800-BOOKLOG, or 800-247-6553 direct, to order.

    Reply
  42. charlie 316
    February 22, 2007 at 9:50 pm

    #37 – it’s not Kareem who presented a bad view of Egypt, it’s the idiots who brought these trumped up charges and ran this farce of a trial, not to mention the masses who went along with it or worse encouraged the authorities. Modern Pharoah didn’t like it when several people including me suggested that 5000 years of history and civilisation was coming to an end in Egypt, but this is another nail in the coffin.

    I am sorry to say this, but it now looks as if Egypt is sinking to the level of Zimbabwe in terms of the image it presents to the world in terms of its governance and justice system. Still you’ll have to work a little harder to sink to the level of Sudan and Somalia, but the death wish is obviously there.

    So long and thanks for the memories.

    Reply
  43. Uchuck the Tuchuck
    February 23, 2007 at 1:41 am

    What the crap was that “Palestine Conspiracy” ad doing here? As annoying as a telemarketer calling while your on the john. Or while your not on the john.

    Modern Pharoah: “ps: IN USA yesterday over 22 murders and 35 sexual assaults took place..so don’t think this is Heaven here either.”

    I don’t get it. What does this statistic have to do with arresting a pack of terrorist ratbags in Sinai?

    Reply
  44. Uchuck the Tuchuck
    February 23, 2007 at 1:43 am

    And I would be much smarter if I proof-read before hitting the submit button. Please read “your” as “you’re” in the previous post.

    Reply
  45. leo
    February 23, 2007 at 2:17 am

    asiatown77 @ 43.

    Excelent jest.

    OLIVE GROVE BOOKS @ 45.

    Please, never do this again if you want even remote chance to sell your book.

    Reply
  46. BrooklynJon
    February 23, 2007 at 3:16 am

    MP @15,

    “There is no Answer to the Palestinian issue guys! The palis Deserve Part of their land back, and so does the Israeli who was born and raised in Israel now and knows it as his home!”

    I pretty much agree. What’s just a little ironic is that in 1907, you could have written exactly the same sentence, substituting “Jew” for “Pali” and “Arab” for “Israeli”.

    “This problem could have been solved in the begining but now….its too late!”

    Here’s where we disagree. See my comment above.

    “ps: IN USA yesterday over 22 murders and 35 sexual assaults took place..so don’t think this is Heaven here either”

    Yup. When I left New York to go to Jerusalem during Intifada I in 1988, everyone thought I was nuts. Of course, the reality was exactly the opposite.

    Reply
  47. new york observer
    February 23, 2007 at 4:37 am

    Zvi @ 10,

    “you say potato, …….”

    The cease-fire will go up in flames

    By Gideon Levy

    Here is the forecast: In a few days, there will be a targeted killing operation. The military correspondents will recite: “He was one of the senior operatives of Hamas (or Islamic Jihad), and was responsible for producing and smuggling large amounts of armaments.” In response, a barrage of Qassams will fall on Sderot. One of the residents might be injured. In the process of the targeted killing operation, some passersby might also be killed; the correspondents will then recite: “They were armed.”

    Several days later, there might be a terror attack. The leaders of the right-wing parties and the Labor Party will be interviewed on television and will recite: “Abu Mazen has once again demonstrated that he is incapable and unwilling to fight terror. There is no one to talk to.” Public Security Minister Avi Dichter will propose turning Beit Hanun into a ghost town. Eli Yishai will suggest bombing from the air. The next day, Qassams will fall again, and the IDF will enter the northern Gaza Strip. The cease-fire will go up in flames.

    This is not a bold wager. This is almost the exact series of events that occurred in previous cease-fires. What was is what will be. There are plenty of examples. In January 2002, after several months of quiet, the Tanzim activist Raed Karmi was assassinated in Tul Karm. Dichter, who was then the head of the Shin Bet, pushed for this action, of course. Immediately afterwards, Fatah began its suicide bombing attacks.

    Several months later, the Tanzim announced a unilateral cease-fire. Shortly thereafter, in July 2002, Salah Shehadeh was assassinated in Gaza in a one-ton bombing, which also killed 15 innocent residents. That was the end of the cease-fire.

    At the beginning of the summer of 2003, the hudna was declared. A week later, the police counter-terror unit targeted Mahmoud Shawer in Qalqiliyah. During the first week of the hudna, the IDF arrested 320 Palestinians. After two months of the hudna, Israel targeted Ismail Abu Shenab, 53. “He has been a wanted man for years,” the reporters recited. The next day, 15 mortar shells were fired at Gush Katif and three Qassams at Israel. In August, Israel also assassinated Mohammed Sidr, the head of the military branch of Islamic Jihad in Hebron, and that was the end of the hudna.

    Several months later, in December 2003, the IDF embarked on a broad operation. The objective: Sheikh Ibrahim Hamed, head of the military branch of Hamas in Ramallah. The precise date: the day the Geneva Initiative was launched.

    Coincidental timing? Doubtful. In April 2004, when negotiations between Yasser Arafat and Hamas were progressing, Israel assassinated Abed Aziz Rantisi. The negotiations stalled.

    In July 2005, the tahadiya was also threatened: In a single day, Israel targeted seven in Salfit and in Gaza. A month later, another five in Tul Karm. In June 2006, just as Mahmoud Abbas was about to declare a referendum vote on the prisoners’ document, Israel targeted Jamal Abu Samhadana, the commander of the Popular Resistance Committees in Gaza. A few days later, the Ghaliya family was killed on the Gaza beach, whether by an IDF shell or “dud.” The referendum went up in smoke, together with the prisoners’ document. Hamas threatened to resume terror attacks after 17 quiet months. The Qassams started to fall on Sderot in frightening numbers. Thus, systematically: Every time a chance emerges, a liquidation is quick to follow. The IDF and Shin Bet, not the statesmen, dictate the developments.

    The current cease-fire was achieved thanks to the U.S. president’s visit in Jordan. Israel responded to the Palestinian initiative – again it is a Palestinian initiative, there has never been an Israeli initiative – after the military operations were bitter failures. After “Summer Rains” and “Autumn Clouds,” after 80 were killed in one week in Beit Hanun, the firing of Qassams did not stop. The IDF hurried to respond with a typical sour countenance: Senior officers in the Southern Command expressed strong opposition in off-the-record conversations, the chief of staff was quick to declare that “the IDF was only a partially a partner in the decision” and the defense minister expressed reservations about expanding the cease-fire to the West Bank.

    The IDF is not interested in the cease-fire. One can assume that neither is the Shin Bet. Reports on how the cease-fire is already being exploited for redeployment on the other side are flooding the media. And the end is known in advance. Instead of Israel promoting the cease-fire, it is acting to undermine it. A cease-fire is bad for the IDF, especially when it stems from its failures as in Lebanon and Gaza.

    How intolerably easy it is for the IDF to undermine the relative quiet that has been achieved. One assassination is enough. A single soldier at a checkpoint is capable of igniting a conflagration. When the IDF wants it, every broom opens fire. And the IDF wants it, unfortunately.

    Moreover, the IDF is now being asked not only to show restraint, but also to take a series of practical steps to make life easier for the Palestinians. In the meantime, how surprising, there is no sign of this. Anyone wishing to confirm this can drive to the Hawara checkpoint and see with his own eyes the transit of cattle there, which is called a human passageway. Another example? During a two-day period at the end of the week, the IDF arrested over 50 Palestinians in the West Bank. Why exactly now?

    “I reach out my hand in peace to our Palestinian neighbors,” Ehud Olmert said in his Sde Boker speech, his most impressive speech, which promises the Palestinians half of heaven and earth. This speech is liable to be washed in blood. Perhaps the Palestinians will be to blame, but no less than this is the gnawing fear that the IDF and Shin Bet will return to their destructive patterns of action.

    It is now not only a matter of the danger of renewed hostile activity, but a much more fateful question: Who rules in Israel and who is really dictating its path? During the coming weeks, Israelis should carefully monitor the developments. Let’s establish a “Cease-Fire Watch,” and watch to see who is once again maliciously undermining it.

    Reply
  48. Howie
    February 23, 2007 at 5:58 am

    New York Obsever

    People will choose to begin history wherever it fits their agenda.

    Reply
  49. Betsy
    February 23, 2007 at 6:56 am

    As a victim of the Dahab bombing last year, I am sad to know that those El-Arishi-nut-jobs are still plotting more attacks with the help of the Palestinians, but I am so relieved to know that some of them were captured. Sick Fucks! ( And before anyone gets all P.C. on my ass I have the right to say that since we are still recovering last year’s Sinai bombing.)

    What really gets me though is how people just pass it off as acts against Israelis, so it’s not such a big deal. How warped is it that the death of innocent Israeli is worth more than the death of an innocent Egyptian. If these Jihadi Fucks wanted to kill just Israelis that could so in Israel but it isn’t as simple as that. This El Arish group believe that it is just to wage Jihad against Muslim that are not fundamental like themselves. Muslim that would visit a place as sinful as Sharm or Dahab. These are Muslims out to kill other Muslims yet it is constantly downplayed and written off as an Israeli issue. When Al Jazeera refers to the Taba bombing they only mention the 11 Israelis killed- not the 12 other Egyptians. Maybe I’m really off here but I think that the value of a person’s life shouldn’t be lessened because of their nationality and Egyptians should be fucking outraged that this is happening on their soil, to their people, and by their own people but instead they nearly sympathize with terrorists as long as there is some Israeli blood on the ground at the end of the day. As long as the Middle East keeps framing all of it’s problems around Israel, they will continue to suffer at the hands of there fellow brothers unaware.

    Reply
  50. Zvi
    February 23, 2007 at 10:13 am

    @NY Observer

    Except this time 2 suicide bombing operations were clearly in progress at the same time as the summit. One of them was to take place in EGYPT, and was interrupted by the EGYPTIANS, not the Israelis.

    This is simply a reprise of the usual behavior. Israel pulls every last Israeli out of Gaza and completely ceases fire on that border. The Palestinians have a chance to start building something, FINALLY. They’re on their own there. But instead they start launching rockets at Sderot. Israel does not respond. They launch more rockets. Israel does not respond. They launch even more rockets. Gradually, Israel starts responding. Finally, at the urging of Syria and Hizballah, they invate Israel, kidnap Shalit and Israel returns in force to Gaza.

    The major truces of the 1990s were wrecked by Islamic Jihad suicide bombings, and BOTH the Israelis AND the Palestinians identified Damascus as the source of the instructions to carry out the attacks. DAMASCUS, not local IJ “commanders” taking the initiative.

    @Olive Garden: Sheesh, can the spam.

    @loves2spooj LMAO that’s very good.

    @BISA That’s horrible. :-(

    Reply
  51. Roman Kalik
    February 23, 2007 at 11:08 am

    @NY Observer:

    A biased view and some paranoia can take some a very long way. And if some facts disappear along the way, then too bad, eh?

    Reply
  52. BISA
    February 23, 2007 at 2:16 pm

    @Betsy: Your comment reminds me of Khobar Towers incident in Saudi in 1996. Official headlines said “19 American soldiers killed in bomb attack on army barracks” but in reality, Khobar Towers was an apartment complex that housed hundreds of regular Saudi families. But that whole aspect of 400 Saudis being wounded was really downplayed..Same thing as sinai…as long as they got some Americans it’s all good I guess?

    Reply
  53. asiatown77
    February 23, 2007 at 3:11 pm

    Said it before and will say it (and plagarise Golda Meir in doing so) again. Peace will come when the Palestinians love their children more than they hate Israelis.

    Reply
  54. anwar
    February 24, 2007 at 8:38 pm

    there will be no peace with the occupier, there will be no peace with the enemy. get out of the palestininian land and stop trying to play the victim.

    Reply
  55. Danny
    February 25, 2007 at 1:52 am

    The criminal parts of the Koran
    Filed under: Uncategorized — siad @ 19:29
    It seemed that the mainstream media in Denmark would not release our press release. But one newspaper has just defied the fear(!) and made an article (in danish): http://politiken.dk/indland/article251308.ece

    We have send it to Al Jazeera, and we will try to get in touch with the foreign medias. Maybe they are not so reluctant as the danish, who definately are afraid of making another Muhammed crisis.

    The leader of SIAD, Anders Gravers

    The danish party, SIAD, demands parts of the Koran forbidden in Denmark in accordance with the Danish ConstitutionSIAD hereby draws attention to the fact that the Koran is in violation of the
    Danish Constitution’s paragraphs 67 and 69. SIAD further claims that mosques
    should be forbidden in consonance with paragraph 78, clause 2.

    SIAD also demands that all koran verses incompatible with Danish customs and
    traditional values should be banned in accordance with the Danish
    Constitution’s paragraphs 67 and 69, which states that “Citizens have the
    right to form communities with a view to practising religion in accordance
    with their faith, but on condition that nothing is taught or done that is at
    odds with morality or public order”.

    Paragraph 69 explains this injunction in more detail.“The status of
    religious communities outside the Danish Folkekirke shall be specified by
    law”.

    We also demand that the Minister of Justice apply paragraph 78, clause 2 of
    the Danish constitution, which states that “societies using violence or
    seeking to achieve their ends with violence, fomentation of violence or other
    unlawful pressure on those of a different opinion, shall by dissolved by law”.

    According to paragraph 78 clause 2 this automatically includes every mosque
    in so far as those parts of the koran in inciting to violence, murder or
    threats to people of different opinions are read out there.
    SIAD has previously demanded a prohibition of the koran in 2005, but this
    time we demand it in accordance with the Danish Constitution, which the
    minister of justice has sworn to uphold.

    SIAD, Stop the islamification of Denmark

    Reply
  56. BrooklynJon
    February 25, 2007 at 4:24 am

    anwar,

    “there will be no peace with the occupier, there will be no peace with the enemy. get out of the palestininian land and stop trying to play the victim.”

    What a warm fuzzy! Now I just want to give you a big hug!

    bj

    Reply
  57. Leauki
    February 25, 2007 at 3:58 pm

    I assume Anwar takes it as read that the “occupier” is Israel whereas the Muslim invaders who took Israel from the previous occupier are the rightful owners?

    So where should the Jews live?

    Reply
  58. Leauki
    February 25, 2007 at 3:59 pm

    Anwar,

    If Arabs don’t want the Jews to play the victim, Arabs have to stop killing them. It’s not about Jewish attitude, you know.

    Reply
  59. leo
    February 25, 2007 at 8:04 pm

    Leauki @ 61, 62

    Do not jump in to conclusion.

    How do you know what Anwar @ 58 meant?

    I do not belive he made himself clear enough for you to be able to assign roles.

    Reply

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