Consequences & Opprutunities

Consequences of the border breach… 

According to Hamas' announcement last night, the two
terrorists responsible for yesterday morning's attack in Dimona set out
from Hebron. At the same time, the original and reasonable assumption
that the bombers had moved from Gaza, via Sinai, to the Negev was based
on the profusion of intelligence warnings that had multiplied following
the breach of the border between Gaza and Egypt. These warnings are
still current, and continue to concern the security establishment.

This situation was created by the helplessness of Egypt, which did
not hasten to close the breaches, and the permission it gave to Gaza
civilians to enter its territory. But it was also caused by
carelessness, or at least excessive complacence on the part of Israel,
which for years has not bothered to build a real fence along its long
border with Egypt. Those who until now have taken advantage of this
open border to smuggle refugees, women or drugs used it yesterday to
bring across the terrorists who carried out the attack. Anyone, then,
who is looking for a target for blame can find it equally in Egypt and
Israel.

..present us with a unique Opportunity..

The Foreign Ministry is recommending that Israel
allow Egypt to double the number of soldiers it has stationed along its
borders with Israel and Gaza – something that Cairo has long wanted to
do, but that Jerusalem has hitherto vetoed.

Since the Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty strictly limits the forces
that Egypt can deploy along these borders, any increase would require
Israel's consent.

Foreign Ministry Tzipi Livni plans to present her ministry's
recommendation Wednesday at a special meeting in the Prime Minister's
Office concerning the Gaza-Egypt border. 

Secure the borders people. by any means necessary! 

0 comment on Consequences & Opprutunities

  1. John Cunningham
    February 5, 2008 at 11:33 am

    Now they’re going to put up a better wall? Isn’t that like closing the barn door after the horses got out?

    Reply
  2. dick
    February 5, 2008 at 3:29 pm

    Walling off the israel-egypt border is a crummy solution for two countries seeking to achieve at least the semblance of peaceful cooperation. And would add to the israeli siege mentality. Better to have egyptian troops enforcing an orderly immigration policy. Put another way: shoot the loonies when they try to enter by force.

    Reply
  3. AF
    February 5, 2008 at 6:09 pm

    Doubling the forces will do nothing. Egypt is quite capable of defending its border if not for an outdated peace treaty and 2 billions dollars a year of American aid. If the Israelis PREFER the psychological comfort of not having a friendly Egyptian Army on their border TO having real security, then only THEY are to blame.

    Reply
  4. Feckless Badger
    February 5, 2008 at 6:38 pm

    I tend to place the blame on the actual human beings that do the deeds. Who CAN truely be responsable for another’s actions?
    Or is it like this… You call me a name so I slap your mother … and we are all three to blame.

    Reply
  5. Yaeli
    February 5, 2008 at 8:54 pm

    I want a nice big wall. Uh, and I like Abbas’ idea about building a moat alongside Gaza. Bring in the handy dandy Egyptian soldiers (Go Livni for supporting this!). Nice big wall, nice deep moat, nice fully armed Egyptian policemen 🙂 My only request is could you please do all this soon cos I’d like to spend my first vacation in 7 years in the Sinai this summer.

    Reply
  6. leo
    February 5, 2008 at 9:22 pm

    John Cunningham @ 1,

    Granted, couple of horses got out but there are plenty of horses in the barn still.

    Reply
  7. tommy
    February 5, 2008 at 9:51 pm

    Walling off the israel-egypt border is a crummy solution for two countries seeking to achieve at least the semblance of peaceful cooperation. And would add to the israeli siege mentality. Better to have egyptian troops enforcing an orderly immigration policy. Put another way: shoot the loonies when they try to enter by force.

    Good fences make good neighbors. I don’t see how a wall on the Egypt-Israeli border is going to affect people on either side much. It will affect the ability of Hamas to penetrate Israel via Gaza.

    Reply
  8. tommy
    February 5, 2008 at 9:53 pm

    I want a nice big wall. Uh, and I like Abbas’ idea about building a moat alongside Gaza.

    Yes, a deep moat alongside Gaza would be excellent. It would definitely make digging tunnels a bit more difficult.

    Reply
  9. Steve
    February 6, 2008 at 4:02 am

    I agree, good fences make good neghbors. I wish we could follow that advice here in America.

    Reply
  10. Roman Kalik
    February 6, 2008 at 5:41 am

    @dick,

    The border fence between Israel and Jordan didn’t contribute to the Israeli “siege mentality”. Maybe it’s because the *lack* of one (and the lack of security that comes with that) is the one that makes people feel insecure, thus making them feel constantly under attack?

    Unless Egypt puts tens of thousands of people at the border, there’s no chance of closing to infiltration. And we can’t have infiltration here, dick, because if drug smugglers and migrants can go through (a big issue in itself) then so can people with guns and bombs.

    Reply
  11. Ruth
    February 6, 2008 at 7:44 am

    The Egyptian army is composed of Egyptian soldiers. While the Egyptian government has sort of cold peace with Israel the general population has not come round. Hate of Israel is wide spread. Why would anybody expect Egyptian soldiers to be friendly?

    Then there is also the issue of bribery. The Palaestinians are actually quite affluent (thanks to international generosity). Let’s assume that they decide to invest into their aim of killing Jews and destablizing Israel. Do you really think the the Egyptian troups would say no to a good enough offer, especially if they can sympathize with the aim?!

    Reply

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