Lest you forget

There is a general feel of malaise and melancholy affecting jan25 protesters, for they feel as if they have accomplished nothing: that the SCAF has halted the revolution and ended it, and it was all for naught. Now this kind of talk infuriates me, not because of its self-pitying whiney nature from otherwise strong people, but because it’s categorically not true. Let me count the ways:

  1. I’ve been in this since 2005, from the Blogosphere old guard, and for 6 years me, alongside of the others I’ve worked with, were simply trying to get the people to get one idea into their heads: If we all, as people, get together in big numbers, and go to a public square protesting, we will bring down the President. That he is not the inevitable, immovable, god-like figure we made him up to be. And we accomplished that, pressuring Mubarak enough to bring him down. This is the first time in 7000 years of continuous tyrannical rule that Egyptians managed to depose their ruler by their own hands. That’s a change in a 7000 year behavioral pattern of eat. Think about that.
  2. Historically, Egyptians have always succumbed to the violent actions of whatever internal security force that runs Egypt, foreign or domestic. Up until the revolution, people were discounting the nation that Egyptians, even if they are out in numbers, would ever win a face-off with the police, always citing the 77 riots, and how 2 million Egyptians went to the streets and were beaten up by the police despite their size. Jan25 has also reversed that trend forever, by beating up the police every single time they have faced them, to the point that in order for the police forces to get into and take back Tahrir, they have to be there in the protection of the army forces. The memory of 77 is replaced and erased forever; for now we pity the police more than anything. This, historically also, has never happened in 7000 years.
  3. Being under tyrannical rule for this long, Egyptians also grew apathetic to whatever it is that the government does, and got used to not being part of the decision-making process. Now, they are embedded with the idea of democracy, voting, and having their voice count. I don’t think any of you realize how many people will head to the polls this election, with some estimates pointing towards up to 80% voter turnout. This is unprecedented, and unlikely to go away. The days of voter apathy are over. We did that.
  4. Also, in the history of this great nation, never was there an incident where Egyptians held their rulers accountable. Now, we have not only removed the president, we have also put him on trial. It doesn’t matter if it’s a Kangaroo court; the historical precedent is there, not just on a local, but on a regional level. This has NEVER happened. We are now the people that removed their president and put him behind bars on trial. Think about what that means before you discount it. We not only created history, we have changed the narrative of this country forever.

Some will respond that this is well and good, but we haven’t accomplished our goals, to which I respond that this is normal, because, let’s face it, we were not ready. What happened is of such magnitude that we chose not to truly believe it, to the point that we are willing to revert to the notion that this is of no significance, and that we accomplished nothing. And not only were we not ready, we also made mistakes, specifically because we weren’t prepared at all to take on the military institution that secretly runs this country. But this might not even be our fight. We have brought the country thus far, and are still pushing, but the real game is 3-5 years down the line, when the newer generations emerge. Three days ago I went to the meeting of Students for Change, which is a group of 16 year olds amongst various school that wish to reform the educational system, and organizing their fellow students all over Egypt, and have a plan to do so. Those are 16 year olds who learned from us, are organizing themselves, and will soon enough become a force to be reckoned with. Can you imagine what they will do when they turn 21?

There are generations to come that will carry this out & will never repeat our mistakes. This revolution is only the start, and it won’t end until the equation is balanced, even if we lost steam for now. And we should also know that we will get there, but we just won’t do that at our time table. We were overly ambitious, hoping to change 30 years of corruption and institutional disintegration in a few months. It doesn’t work like that, but we managed to get the country to take the big leap forward in the right direction. We are simply not all there yet. And we are not aided by the state the country is in after 30 years of Mubarak’s rule, for he left the country’s foundations in such a horrible condition that brought it to the fragile shape that it is in right now. Those who accuse you that you did this to the country are either morons or liars, claiming that you broke something that was already broken, and completely ignoring that what you aim to do, more than anything, is to fix it. And we will get there, because really, what other choice do we have?

And if you believe we will never be able to bring down the military rule of Egypt and turn it into a real civil state, well, 6 years ago, we, a tiny minority started chanting “Down with Mubarak”, which no one dared to do before, while the rest of the country looked at us as aliens; 6 years later we as people pressured him down. Now, we are breaking the taboo of chanting against the SCAF and military rule, which was even a bigger taboo than chanting against Mubarak. Do you see where this is going? We have started deconstructing the military state, and sooner or later we will get them to back off, and maybe, just maybe, remind them that they work for us, and not the other way around. This day will eventually come, because the process has started, and all we need is time, and time is on our side.

Please understand, this is not an invitation to stop, or not go to Tahrir on 9/9. This is your country, and protesting is your blood-earned right, so don’t let anyone dissuade you from exercising it if you believe that it’s necessary. This is an invitation to give yourselves some credit. Our generation, for better or worse, forever changed the history of this country. Be proud of that.

 

49 Comments on Lest you forget

  1. Yehia salah ELDin
    September 8, 2011 at 10:34 am

    Great one, very true, needed it this way to recapitulate things and charge up

    Reply
  2. cyberstorm
    September 8, 2011 at 10:37 am

    Good Sandmonkey. This world is changing – and all those who are living now has to change their part for the better. That takes persistence. When people become disheartened, and everything seems too complex or overwhelming – focus on your part in the whole goal. Preserve yourself for the long run. Learn what you can about how things work while not allowing yourself to be diverted from too many things.

    And – be kind to yourself, your neighbor.

    Reply
    • virginia
      September 10, 2011 at 5:59 am

      Wise words from a good man. Being vigilant about our own actions and motivations as well as the actions of others, is the only way to stay off the path of corruption. How we get caught in a web of deceit and lies is the stuff of history and literature, but it is also the stuff of reality – all over the world. A decade ago I was a teacher at Monash University doing what I loved which was teaching. Taking a unit that was normally taught by another lecturer, I discovered a incredibly bad case of plagairism by that lecturer. Reporting it to my “superiors” led all the way to Mal Logan (pro vice chancellor) who promptly denied any responsibility for taking any action against the lecturer. In the end, nothing was done to him, but action was constantly taken against students who did the same thing. It made me sick. This place of learning I loved, this bastion of knowledge and wisdom that was intended in some ways to establish some moral truths by which we could all live, was nothing but an emperor’s palace. And the emperor had no clothes, but was covered in lies and courtiers who would do anything to keep their place in court covered him in faint praise. On the surface, I saw a university engaged in shameless self-promotion, but underneath another reality existed. I left after the unit I was teaching was denied resources (of markers and tutors) and after one of my students suicided. She was from Singapore and almost catatonic with shyness and being homesick. Looking for her one night, I drove through the ghetto that housed the overseas students and found her house. She answered the door with a can of beer in her hand and I knew then she was in trouble. Next day on my request, she came to see me. That day like all the others, I had students queuing all down the corridor wanting help. So I made her a cup of coffee and asked her to wait. She sat for a while then left. I never saw her again. She had killed herself. The university couldn’t have cared less than they did and not one mention was made of her. But I had let her down more than anyone. In her pain, she had showed me her trust and in return I showed her nothing but my haste and ignorance. Now I live in vigilance, always looking for weakness in my head and heart, always looking for any sign of moral erosion and always looking for ways in which I may be diverted from the truth. I live with Juanne in my heart and in her name I will never knowingly do evil again. I will not justify my actions with the excuse of expediencey.
      The people of North Africa and the Middle East live in the same university. The things that are being done to them in the name of that institution are based on the lies of cheats. Cheats who will do anything to protect their position because it gives them access to the fortunes made by the common people. Be vigilant against the smoke and mirrors they will use to cover the truth. Don’t be rendered catatonic by the lies of the emperors. Remember, people all over the world are trying to watch over you through groups like Amnesty. You occupy our hearts. Bless you.

      Reply
  3. Adriana
    September 8, 2011 at 10:39 am

    Thank you! i needed to hear exactly what you wrote! Ashamed of myself for letting negativity take over my believes.

    Reply
  4. elisa ferrero
    September 8, 2011 at 10:52 am

    I agree, that’s what I believe too. Thanks a lot! These words were needed, I’ll spread them around. You are my confirmed favourite blogger :)

    Reply
  5. MoShewy
    September 8, 2011 at 10:52 am

    You always manage to make me feel more positive. WE changed history damnit!

    Reply
  6. DementedBonxie
    September 8, 2011 at 11:57 am

    You have done well. You are doing well. Of, course, every time you gain ground, score a point, the ‘powers that be’ will put bigger obstacles in your way, to stop you from getting further. Be proud, you’ve rattled their cage.
    It’s a marathon rather than a sprint, tho’ there’s a series of sprint along the course. Be wise as serpents and harmless as doves. Never give up.

    Reply
  7. Helen
    September 8, 2011 at 12:44 pm

    You Egypt have pulled out the foundations of your faulted government system and now start from scratch – you haven’t lost steam, it’s just phase two: a different process and procedure required and produced. Phase one was very physical and used a different part of your mental state to survive it. Phase two needs all your mental alertness for it will be filled with negotiations and manipulations. Phase three will be adaptation – The Revolution didn’t fail.
    You won!
    Yes there are still very evil people living amongst you determine to protect their livelihood at all costs. Egypt can’t do what France did in its revolution… kill all the upper class. Nor put them (those who are corrupt) into jail.. the web of deceit runs deep from the gathering results – burnt information, people changing testimonies, people ‘under pressure’ – from who? So a trade off to bring Egypt through is a suggestion. The Prophet (PBUH) negotiated access to Mecca first. People are more adapt to helping others whenever their safeguards are in place. So offer them immunity for exchange to building the nation as democracy that is transparent – their behaviour to be so too from that point on. There has been so much corruption, via looks of it down to the grass roots, the only way up is through forgiveness that gives hope for a future. Correction of the main conspirators – Mubarak etc continue.. but at some stage the only way to clean up is to negotiate. it’s not sell out, it’s a clean up and than build up. You have the chance to make a good example of democracy working for its people not the other way around.

    Reply
  8. kaim ragab
    September 8, 2011 at 8:15 pm

    Bravo! Great post that Puts things in perspective

    Reply
  9. Pete Laybourn
    September 8, 2011 at 10:53 pm

    Sandmonkeyman -
    Very,very, well said indeed. Cowboy Up and hang in there.
    Cheyenne Wyoming USA

    Reply
  10. Tallulah
    September 8, 2011 at 11:21 pm

    There is a Chinese proverb that says: a journey of a thousand miles begins with one small step.

    Egyptians have taken that small step, and then some. You are on the right path. Believe that! Keep taking those small steps and one day you’ll look back and be amazed at your journey!

    Reply
  11. Muslim
    September 9, 2011 at 2:56 pm

    Today was the demonstration of the secularists:

    http://www.almasryalyoum.com/en/node/493819

    look at the picture, that was the whole demonstration.

    The demonstrations of the islamists was on 29.july.2011
    Here the video of the demonstration
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wx5DHjTiAMQ&feature=related

    Sandmonkey wrote about the Sharia demonstrations (29th.july):
    “So, the Islamists may have proven they can get numbers,
    but they have lost the center with this move. Good Job.”

    And my answer is:
    “So, the secularists have undoubtly proven they can not get numbers,
    but they still hoping to win the center with this move. Very bad Job.”

    Reply
    • mohamed
      September 11, 2011 at 12:38 am

      that pic was taken before the friday prayers, which as u should know are the starting point for the protests.

      as for the real deal, either u don’t have tv at home or u believe we r a bunch nitwits who can’t browse the internet for ourselves.

      grow up plz

      Reply
      • Muslim
        September 13, 2011 at 8:59 am

        What is your point?
        That the demonstration got numbers like the pro sharia demonstration?
        wake up plz

        Reply
  12. Raouf
    September 10, 2011 at 6:01 am

    Good points Sandmonkey and you are right about being proud for what has occurred earlier this year.

    Something needs to be said about the feeling that “we have not accomplished our goals”
    Have we thought about what are the appropriate actions in order for these goals to be accomplished?
    Can demonstrations in the square ever resolve the problems of traffic, housing, education or health care in Egypt or anywhere else for that matter.
    Do we really expect these problems to be solved by yelling at officials?
    What IS the appropriate actions for these problems.
    Why not have that objective as one’s goal.
    If not shouting in the street then what?
    (no one is asking not to shout in the street but at least one should be honest to recognize that it is as effective as jumping in the Nile)

    Look at how Japan is rebounding after its devastating earthquake.
    Hint: they did not do it by demonstrations.
    True the prime minister resigned, but that has little to do with the rebuilding effort.
    Japan also rebounded after loosing a war and being hit with atom bombs in WWII.

    Different goals require different actions.
    Building requires different thinking than railing at the dictator.

    Reply
  13. Yaeli
    September 10, 2011 at 11:43 am

    I guess, as your little neighbour next door, I am finding it hard to share your optimism. I look at the mob attack on our embassy last night and the fact that our ambassador, diplomats and their families had to be whisked out of the country and embassy workers beaten up and needing to be rescued by an Egyptian commando, looking at the increasing attacks on the Christian communities, the anarchy in the Sinai, the Islamists coming out in large numbers in the streets and I’m frankly very frightened of where things are going in Egypt.

    I’m frightened for you too and the other young secular leaders because we all know what happened just a year out from the revolution in Iran.

    Reply
  14. Don
    September 10, 2011 at 5:31 pm

    I wish the people of Egypt peace and the self determination of a representative democracy.
    I have a few questions.
    I imagine the average ‘Egyptian in the street’ has no great love of Israel but the are the actions of the demonstrators at the embassy last night representative of the feelings of the majority of the progressive elements of the revolution? I suspect agent provocateurs trying to stir up dung and sidetrack a meaningful transfer of power in Egyptian Governance. Am I deluded?
    Other than your excellent blog can you recommend other writings that truthfully portray the efforts of progressive people to organise new political organizations with a view to running in eventual elections?
    Thanks.

    Reply
  15. Karen
    September 10, 2011 at 9:23 pm

    Egyptians are going to end up with the government they deserve. And the new boss isn’t going to be much different than the old boss. It’s unfortunate, but I see the writing on the wall, so to speak.

    Reply
  16. hoda
    September 11, 2011 at 12:13 am

    I agree with you, Sandmonkey, that so far some progress has been made. We dared to break from the mould and we dared to demand the ousting of a long-standing despot. But more importantly, we dared to do this in vast numbers, with peaceful determination and persistence and we have suceeded. This is unprecedented.
    But, we have seen, again and again, interlopers hijacking the revolution, under many banners, and with varying agendas. We are also now swayed in different directions with a multitude of matters that have risen to the surface as a consequence of the revolution, the religious aspects, the baltagia, the trials or absence of such, the neighbours, the economy, the prime minister, constitutional changes, presidential elections or parliamentary elections first, the military trials of civilians….etc, etc.
    With a little levelheadedness, We need to avoid being distracted by these diversions, we need to stop finding every single excuse on earth on why this wonderful revolution is stalling and we need to proactively regroup under common demands and remain on track. These demands should address next steps such as stability, growth, and social justice.
    The momentum of the revolution has brought down the heads of a long standing corrupt system, but the vacuum was not filled by a confident and forward-driven revolutionary body, hence, every group with a little clout is trying to fill this vacuum. We need to fill this vacuum with the right mix that realises the ultimate goals of this revolution, stability, growth and social justice under the banner of solid democracy.
    We are stuck in a quagmire of analysis and no counteraction. Analysis of current events is a means not an end. We seem to have forgotten the big picture by wallowing in minutiae.
    The beauty of the people is still here, the determination is still here, the vision for a better Egypt is still here. What is lacking is a concentrated effort in driving the change for a better Egypt. Instead of physically reclaiming tahrir square to prove that our voice is still heard, and then saying nothing of significance to the masses, symbolically reclaim tahrir by working together to distribute pamphlets on how to increase production, on how to understand democracy, on how to support the ailing economy by working one overtime shift each week with no financial compensation, on how to truly understand and implement religious tolerance. Symbolically reclaim tahrir and bring in and organised structure of the various social ngo’s that provide free treatment clinics, SMEs, clean up cities and towns, or signups for “Mahou Omia” groups in “Ashwaiyat” and low income areas. Symbolically reclaim tahrir to have open forums on how to improve the economy, how to create collaborations between the main sectors and the people to address reform, such as in education, the police, agriculture, tourism, industry, equality of women, so on.
    The revolution was not born to stop military trials of civilians, it was not born to stop salafis, or Israel, or to burn a flag here or to criticize a public figure there. The revolution was born to have a better Egypt for us and for the generations to come.
    Mind you, I am not belittling these events, but we have to admit, such events only satisfy a few, not the all. And we need the all to drive progress and reform.

    Lest we forget our original goal, we need to regroup, rethink, and implement.

    Reply
  17. 传奇私服
    September 11, 2011 at 2:37 am

    Interested in your comment about not exercising in front of a mirror, at my gym 2 treadmills are in front of mirrors and the third isn’t. From now on I will choose the one that isn’t as I always get bored. Be interesting to see if it makes a difference.

    Reply
  18. Denis
    September 11, 2011 at 12:57 pm

    Hi Sandmonkey,
    I would much appreciate if you could give some analysis of what happened
    at the Israeli embassy the other night. I am not asking you to take sides
    (which might or might not be uncomfortable in your position), but I am
    extremely interested as to how these events are perceived from within,
    and what do they spell for the future, when viewed by an intelligent person.
    Thanks.

    Reply
  19. Mike Martin
    September 12, 2011 at 3:44 pm

    Freedom, Justice, and Liberty are never won. We can only work toward them. Here in the US we fight at a different point on the scale but we fight the same fight. Extraordinary rendition, enhanced interrogation are just some new problems we must fight to end. Eisenhower warned us of the military industrial complex back in the 60′s. It is still with us here in the US. Don’t despair, Egypt. You can only move in the right direction. You are doing that. Keep it up. Good luck! We watch and hope.

    Reply
  20. btesh
    September 16, 2011 at 9:43 am

    Posted by William A. Jacobson Thursday, September 15, 2011 at 11:44am

    Here’s your “Arab Spring” and “Arab Street” for you.

    From a BBC correspondent (h/t Daily Dish):

    While walking in the street someone pushed me from behind with such force that I nearly fell over.

    Turning around, I found myself surrounded by five men, one of whom tried to punch me in the face. I stopped the attack by pointing out how shameful it was for a Muslim to assault a guest in his country, especially during Ramadan.

    Relieved that a seemingly random assault was over, I was appalled by the apology offered by one of my assailants. “Sorry,” he said contritely, offering his hand, “we thought you were a Jew.”

    Shaking his head in disbelief on hearing the news, an Egyptian friend sympathised: “That’s stupid, you are obviously not a Jew.”

    The chilling implication I was left with was that, had I been Jewish, the assault would have apparently been justified.

    Just like the attack on Lara Logan, in the new Egypt and elsewhere, looking Jewish is a dangerous thing.

    Reply
  21. Jay
    September 18, 2011 at 8:45 am

    You didnt mention the Muslim Brotherhoods take over and the fact that the only change Egypt is looking forward too, is strict Sharia law, less democracy and war with its neighbors, which in turn will make your economy even worse!.

    Mubarak was bad…sure….but i feel the alternatives at this current time, are worse!

    Reply
  22. Giggles Macshaheedmaker
    September 19, 2011 at 9:56 pm

    the corpse of a jihadi smells like victory

    hunting jihadis, love to hear their little screams
    little fiends with their inbred wee wanking dreams
    love to make them bleed in gushing torrent streams

    jihadis with their tortured shrivelled little bitter sad souls
    as they explode damning God for giving them tiny wee poles
    not fit for the job little monsters like fat man undulating flesh rolls

    Bleed out the jihadi, stare into his eyes as mouth red froth and his guts spill bloody out
    watch as he sees no heaven, no dark eyed houris greeting him with delighted shout
    He’s off to hell this child of mohammed’s lies, because he was too thick to doubt.

    Reply
    • Papa Ray
      October 5, 2011 at 3:05 pm

      Very true and refreshing to those who are not Jihadists. To those who are, don’t worry, they will not understand or want to anyway. Which by the way is the terrible picture of the “average Egyptian in the street”. Most can not read more than street signs or warnings written in red and they get all their education from “the street” which is nothing but millions of rumor mills and tales told that are so exaggerated as to be unbelievable to almost anyone with any education or access to the internet. Which in most middle east countries is less than 10 percent of the population.

      Even then they are stuck with websites and blogs that only present a small portion of truth. Hardly any of these internet viewers speak English or other languages. So they are getting an even more limited peek at the stories – or of the truth.

      Education is the key to a democracy or to a people with a representative government (Republic, such as the U.S.A.). But even nations that have the education and the access, it is all for naught if they are not interested and smart enough to actually take the time and effort to keep themselves educated and current in facts – not rumors – on the street or around the water cooler.

      And take the time and trouble to vote in all elections from local to federal.

      A good example of the last is the United States. It’s citizens neglected their duty and responsibility for over fifty years and look at what they are waking up to now.

      It will take another fifty years or more to get back to what their founding fathers designed and wanted for the U.S. government to be. It will be a much longer and harder fight than the fight in Egypt for it’s citizens.

      Evil is and will do Evil.

      Unless strong men are called forth to fight and do right for their families and their descendents.

      Take Care and Take Care of those you love.

      Reply
  23. Giggles Macshaheedmaker
    September 19, 2011 at 11:14 pm

    What is a muslim like?

    A muslim’s soul is like a pile of freshly dropped shit
    even well aimed there is no target it could hope to hit
    better to have a little think muslim as you shit and sit

    A muslim’s words like a retarded camel’s streaming syphilitic piss
    in they mean as much as a whore’s bought and paid for kiss
    When they are all dead and gone will any, the muslims really miss

    A muslim is not good for much, too inbred fuck witted and ‘tarded an inbred failing breed
    for fertilizer even their shitty word fails the task, their flesh might meet the manure need
    All because they are enslaved to an evil devil spawned and crafted creed

    Reply
  24. Lioh
    September 22, 2011 at 9:46 am

    We Americans are anxiously watching Egypt. In the best circumstances, the picture is muddy with many conflicting sources. I pray that the secular democrats triumph in the long run.

    Reply
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    September 23, 2011 at 1:45 am

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    September 23, 2011 at 11:28 am

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    September 28, 2011 at 2:33 pm

    On the other hand, inside scaled-down businesses, they could carry out some practical things to help his or he

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  29. Giggles Macshaheedmaker
    October 4, 2011 at 11:08 pm

    What happened to the ‘gyptian?

    He stood idle and watched as a bedouin pervet molested his sistert hen raped his Nile Mum

    He stood idle and watched the vile scene, buggy eyes out, slack jawed drooling flowing dumb

    as the bedouin pervet fingered his little sister and in his poor mum’s ass had a good hard cum

    the ‘gyptian looke about after the bearded perv had left, started banging his head like a retard on a drum

    frantic ‘gyptian fuckwit looked about saw an old Jew, said, “I’m going to fuck you up”, given 1 plus 1 “gyptian couldn’t reveal the combined sum

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  31. diana
    October 8, 2011 at 7:50 pm

    Food for thought:

    It’s not often you hear loud and public support for Jews in Arab newspapers, which is why Egyptian journalist Sharif ‘Abd Al-Ghani’s recent article in a Qatari paper is cause for celebration. Al-Ghani attacks Muslim preachers for their hateful language toward Jews. How, he asks, can preachers lead hateful discussion of Jews, yet venerate Moses?

    Why does our sheikh – and we behind him – shower all these curses on the Jews, but then add the expression ‘peace be upon him’ when speaking of their prophet Moussa [Moses]? Are the Jews not people of the Book and among those whom the Koran orders us to treat kindly so long as they do not fight us? And how could Allah have created them so impure and damned if they are the disciples of a prophet?

    He also points out that many inventors and scientists who have changed the world with their work were Jewish. Muslims have benefited from these scientific and medical advancements, he argues, yet Jews are attacked with violent rhetoric in mosques across the world.

    The absurd thing is that after cursing the Jews, the preacher never forgets to urge the attendees to donate [money in order to establish] a dialysis unit in the village… which will treat thousands of patients… But it doesn’t occur to him, or to any of the attendees who say amen after the curses and curse the Jews themselves – many of whom suffer kidney failure – that the man who invented the treatment for this condition is the Jewish doctor and scientist Willem Klofkim [sic, apparently Kolff]!

    O you, those who curse and besmirch the Jews, do you not know that the ‘impure and damned’ Jew Baruch Blumberg discovered the viral liver disease Hepatitis [B] and the treatment for it – a disease that afflicts 12% of Egyptians?

    It’s always worth pointing out advancements in religious tolerance, especially of Muslims toward Jews in the Middle East. Via Meadia hopes that Al-Ghani’s common sense, intellectual honesty and tolerance prove contagious.

    It seems to be a general law of modern life that those who hate and fear Jews are condemned to backwardness and irrelevance: not, as anti-Semitic loons pathetically imagine, because Jewish cabals manipulate capitalism to frustrate their enemies, but because without intellectual clarity and a sincerely tolerant worldview, it is very difficult to prosper in a world like ours.

    In Libya, unfortunately, Al-Ghani’s message hasn’t been received. According to Hadeel Al-Shalchi (@hadeelalsh), on hearing news that a Libyan of Jewish origin was trying to rebuild a synagogue, a mob of ignorant haters assembled outside the hotel in which he is staying, baying for blood in the traditionally chilling and evil (but also pathetic and contemptible) way that they have.

    When I think of the potential of the Arab Spring, it is to courageous voices like Sharif ‘Abd Al-Ghani and Hadeel Al-Shalchi. Political problems with Israel are one thing; unreasoning hate of a people is something else.

    Reply
  32. reality
    October 8, 2011 at 8:15 pm

    Dear Muslims,

    You and we — we are enemies. We think it is time to speak openly. Many honorable people on your side have already done that; it is time for us to do the same for you. We have followed your advice to concern ourselves with Islam. We have seen Obsession, we have read Bat Ye’or and Robert Spencer, we have absorbed the video messages of Osama Bin Laden, as well as the comments of Islam scholars from everywhere — especially of those from Al Azhar university in Cairo — and of Mr. Ahmadinejad. We have listened in particular to the impressive voice of the ordinary Islamic people during the so-called Cartoon Affair. We have thought about our common history and used our God-given reason to draw parallels with the present.

    We have come to the conclusion that we must apologize for our behavior when we did not know everything. It was our mistake — not yours — that we were uninterested and ignorant about you for so long. We also apologize for burdening you for so long with a “dialogue” in which you were certainly right to be annoyed by the ignorance of your interlocutor, and we insisted on wanting to “educate” you to something Christian-like. And we especially apologize for those among us who have coined the terribly insulting term “Islamism” to slander the true believers and those faithful to the Koran. The pedantic attempt to explain your own religion to you (“Islam means Peace”) was an incredible faux pas and we understand that you were frequently annoyed by our arrogance. It is in fact arrogant to bend other people’s religion to be what you would like it to be. We do not begrudge your making the formulation “Islam is Peace” your own. We do know that your own Prophet has advised you to make use of lying (taqiyya), when infidels are too strong to be subjugated militarily. Who are we to advise you to go against the advice of your own Prophet?

    We admit without reserve that you have studied and understood us and our culture in the past decades more extensively than we have yours. We also acknowledge that your course of action — seen in hindsight, now that we know your goals and the methods recommended to you by your Prophet to reach this goal — were almost always straightforward, while ours often resembled a (meandering) footpath.

    Well, now we know what you want. You want to expand Dar al-Islam at the expense of the Dar al-Harb and, in the long run, bring about the domination of the entire world by Islam. We also know that the method for that is called jihad, and we are not stupid enough to believe that jihad only means violence. No, you are not that primitive. Jihad also includes demographic efforts, immigration, da’wa (proselytizing), taqiyya (skillful lying), writing jihad (propaganda) and use of economic power (petrodollars). We even believe you that there is an inner jihad: to lead a life that is pleasing to Allah. That is your private affair. We also do not annoy you with the content of our prayers. Naturally, we do not believe that that is the only meaning of jihad. We are not blind, and thankfully your sacred writings are available for us to read.

    We also recognize that there are differing opinions within your community on whether terrorist violence is an efficient or a counterproductive means of achieving your goals. We wouldn’t like to inject ourselves into that. You should agree among yourselves about tactical and strategic questions. It may reassure you to know that we, for our part, are moving to discussing Counterjihad among ourselves from a purely tactical-strategic perspective — no longer considering which methods are more agreeable to you, but only which ones are more agreeable and likely of success from our point of view.

    By the way, we very much hope that, with the sense God has given you, you see that your intent of Islamizing the whole world or alternatively just Israel and Europe does not appeal to us. It is our sad duty to tell you that we will resist this intention with all means at our disposal. Please note: We do not intend to dissuade you from this purpose. It is not our place, to reverse you religiously and we know that we couldn’t even if we wanted to. We know you are strong in your faith and obedient servants of Allah.

    We will no longer argue with you about your intentions; we will just try to keep you from carrying them out. You know how to defend yourselves against Unbelief. Islamic warlords of the past were well aware that infidels do not wish to come under the domination of Islam. If they had not known that, they would not have sent armed soldiers, but friendly missionaries. You still know that today. If you assumed that the Jews of Israel wanted an Islamization of their land in the sense of an Islamically controlled “Palestine” with a Jewish population ultimately reduced to a tolerated dhimmi status. then you would not have had crush them by blowing them up or shooting rockets at them or making nuclear threats from Tehran. You would only have had to make the suggestion and await their enthusiastic agreement.

    Due to our unforgivable ignorance of your religious responsibilities, we have in the past not realized that your wish is to Islamize our countries. Therefore your advances toward this goal until now — similar to your efforts in regard to Israel — were possible almost without terrorist violence. Anyone who willingly spreads their legs will not be raped. Whoever is voluntarily conquered does not compel the conqueror to use weapons. We must regretfully inform you that we do not intend to be conquered voluntarily.

    Unfortunately, a great number of your colonists are already in our countries. We realize that many of them have no idea that they are functioning as colonists and — certainly to the irritation of the faithful among you — simply want a comfortable life and have no interest in jihad. That is your problem. We see no reason to conduct a dialogue with unknowing private individuals who do not understand that they are chess pieces used for our subjugation. Unfortunately, since we cannot read minds, and because of your discipline of taqiyya, we cannot distinguish the truly peaceful from the pious liars. Besides, you surely recognize that dialogue between two large groups like the Ummah and the West, in which millions of individual conversations are carried on with scattered individuals, cannot be accomplished. On the basis of your and our ideological orientations, we must have this dialogue with those whom you take seriously and not with lax, unorganized individuals.

    So What Are We to Do?

    From the comments made by Islamic organizations and Islamic individuals (as well as their hostile attitude) in our countries, we gather that Muslims do not feel comfortable in the West and do not like us. O.K. We don’t like them either. We will continue to do what these persons criticize as “discrimination, racism and Islamophobia.” For instance, we will continue to have the quirk of filling jobs according to qualifications and not religious quotas, and of insisting that our laws be kept. We know that our laws are false in your eyes because they contradict sharia, but we would like to maintain them nonetheless.

    We would very much like to solve that peaceably but, if necessary, we can also be nasty. We are not as nice as our Bleeding Hearts have been telling your for a long time. We belong to the same species as you and we can also show our ugly side. We hope that you will appreciate this honesty, which you have not been accustomed to from us until now.

    We also do not find it good that our economies pay dearly for oil from Islamic countries and yet support Islamic immigrants, whom we do not need, with social aid, paid for by increasingly oppressive taxes. Here is what we propose: We will continue to pay for the oil, but we will expel the Islamic social welfare cases and the criminal Muslims and completely halt our aid payments. We recognize that the presence of many Muslims in Europe serves your purpose (expansion of Islam). But surely you see also that is does not suit our purpose (preventing the expansion of Islam). Rather, it proves more and more to be counter-productive.

    We would suggest that you accept these deportations and that we on our side pledge not to attempt to export our riff-raff — especially the neo-Nazis — to the rich oil countries. We further pledge not to spread Christianity to your countries “with the sword” or technological warfare. We could do that. We did it in Latin America (and it was very ugly). Today, we don’t want to do that. However, we reserve the decision to intervene militarily, if and when we get the impression that your military development could become dangerous to us (including Israel).

    For the rest, we have no interest in “measuring penises” to compare our military capabilities. We find it crude to make that kind of statement or to boast of superiority — that is an important element of our culture. Nonetheless, you will understand that we are taking stock in this regard — discreetly of course — and encourage you to do the same.

    We would be happy to resolve everything without war and violence, and so we suggest that you carefully calculate your chances of achieving your goal — which is diametrically opposed to ours — by military/terrorist means or immigration. We expect a clear answer when you have decided. Then we could postpone the troublesome subject of Europe’s Islamization several centuries into the future, avoid each other (since we are mutually antipathetical) and concern ourselves with the necessities: our desire for oil and your desire for medicinal and the other attractive achievements of a civil society.

    We would appreciate an honest answer.

    Should you prefer — against our expectations — to resolve the question with violence against persons (Israel is presumed to be part of the West), we will see ourselves forced to likewise become violent. We will hear whiny plaints that you were our victims, but neither believe nor consider them. We are prepared to accept violence against specific objects (national flags, images of heads of government and religious authorities), since we would like to allow you a vent for therapeutic relief of aggression. We are not inhuman. From now on, damaged embassies and any violence will be seen as a declaration of war.

    Sincerely,

    Your Enemy,
    The West

    Reply
  33. Publicola
    October 9, 2011 at 3:55 pm

    @ reality / the West

    I definitely take objection to Your using the word “we” in combination with Your signing the text above with “the West”.
    In Your text above You are rather daringly hijacking for example little old me by using the inadmissibly inclusive “we” and signing it with “the West” – an act of conceited self-delusion,, if I may say so.

    The only excuse I would mercifully accept for You overstepping the proper boundaries of human communication would be the previous extensive consumption of psychoactive-psychotropic-hallucigenic muhsrooms on Your part.

    Reply
  34. diana
    October 9, 2011 at 8:03 pm

    and what happened to the criminals who assaulted Laura Logan?

    Reply
  35. Publicola
    October 9, 2011 at 9:50 pm

    @ diana – Your question “What about the sexual assailants of Lara Logan?”, obviously meaning “Will these delinquents ever be called to account before a court of justice?”, insisting upon the proper juridical prosecution of the offenders, is quite justified.
    The following bits and quotes from a newspaper report might throw some limited light on the general background, the general circumstances and the present situation with respect to the quoted incident and similar cases of public sexual harassment and the probable chances of any legal prosecution of the mentioned physical indecent assault or rape launched on Lara Logan:

    … An Egyptian security official said he was unaware of any investigation into the attack on Logan. He noted that police were pulled off the streets on January 28, three days after the outbreak of the protests, and haven’t returned, with the exception of traffic police. …

    Women in Egypt – and in many areas of the Arab world – are still afraid to report sexual assault or harassment, fearing they and their families will be stigmatised, said Medine Ebeid of Egypt’s New Woman Foundation. …

    Sexual harassment remains widespread in Egypt, and even women covered up by veils and long robes in strict Islamic dress say they are not immune.

    A 2008 survey by the Egyptian Centre for Women’s Rights found that 83 per cent of Egyptian women and 98 per cent of foreign women in Cairo said they had been harassed – while 62 per cent of men admitted to harassing.

    Harassment is often the flip side of conservative mores. Men who believe women should stay out of the public sphere tend to assume that those seen in the streets are fair game. Widespread unemployment leaves young men bored, frustrated and unable to marry.

    Police witnessing harassment have a history of not interfering or even joining in, going after female political activists in particular …

    A proposed law banning sexual harassment and outlining criminal punishment was never put to a vote to parliament. It is unlikely to see any action during Egypt’s ongoing political turmoil, with parliament dissolved and elections not expected for several more months …

    “We believe that when people think about a big thing, all of us collect (gather) for a main goal, our good morals return,” said Hassan, who helps run Harrasmap, a website that allows women to quickly report instances of harassment via text message or Twitter. Uploaded onto a digital map of Cairo, it shows hotspots and areas that might be dangerous for women to walk alone.

    Asma Barlas, an expert on women in Islamic societies at Ithaca College in New York state, said change will likely be slow because traditional attitudes run deep. …

    From: “Egypt uprising proves a short reprieve for women”
    In: WAtoday – February 17, 2011
    http://www.watoday.com.au/world/egypt-uprising-proves-a-short-reprieve-for-women-20110217-1axos.html

    Reply
  36. reality
    October 10, 2011 at 10:43 pm

    Fuck traditional muslims attitudes if they involve muslim imperialism, misogyny, female genital mutilation, resurection of the slave trade a’la their disgusting sunnah, …thinking about it…. fuck all muslim attitudes and fuck muz scum subhuman fuckwits from the unwiped asscrack of humanity. You inbred cunts want war … good as the song goes…let’s get the party started. It will make it much easier to muzzle and liquidate the bleeding hearts and naive useful idiots that defend muz filth in the west. They are the only reason mecca and medina are not smoldering radioactive craters and the arab population hasn’t fallen from hundreds of millions to thousands….on the brightside our militaries are going to get to try out all their finest chemical and biological weapons. It would be crime to use them on humans, since islam strips muz of their former humanity coating their cities in t fine fog of death is as the Auzzies say, “fair fuckin’ dinkum”

    Oh to publicola…

    What makes you think anyone give a shit what offends you, run off and have a little cry, maybe it will make you feel better, you weak fucking tosser.

    Reply
  37. Publicola
    October 10, 2011 at 11:16 pm

    @ reality – Do you need any help ?

    Reply
  38. Ashraf
    October 11, 2011 at 7:16 pm

    @sandmonkey: You dismiss the power of ignorance and decades of brainwashing rather easily. Unfortunately, I believe it will be more difficult than you think to turn the ignorant masses (who are the vast majority in Egypt) from their obedience to the military structure and belief that the Egyptian military is the greatest thing since sliced bread (its even been mentioned in the Koran!) and also their propensity to follow anyone who waves a Koran and says this is haram and this is halal, as the referendum results clearly showed. Speaking as someone who was involved in the protests from the beginning, and until recently an optimist, I believe that the forces at work are more powerful than the minority of intellectual youths like us, who are regarded as simply ‘shabab sees’ by the working class.

    Reply
  39. moncler
    December 10, 2011 at 6:01 pm

    great blog ,thank you ..

    Reply
  40. Gabriel
    December 26, 2011 at 4:21 am

    Great Rant man, this was written September 8 2011, 3 month later, what say you now, so sorry but the so called revolution not only been hijacked, it routed man, the ARMY, The Brothers, and The Saudi Salafis has fucked the country.
    I hope to God that I am wrong and that your assessment is the right one.

    Reply

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